Indigo Children, Defiance and the Classroom: “Why do we have to do this at School?” “I’m Bored” “I’m Outta Here”

Do really we have to do this Miss?” I asked.
I BEG YOUR PARDON?” said the teacher.
I feel this isn’t important because I won’t need to know it when I grow up”.
“HOW DARE YOU! STAND UP AND GO OUTSIDE!”

I can clearly remember saying this scene clearly in mind as if it were last week. I can remember getting reprimanded for speaking my mind and speaking my truth. I knew that I wasn’t interested in what i was learning in my Grade 3 Religion lesson. I was being honest and I was punished. “What relevance did this have in my life and future?” I wondered. I could feel and see that it didn’t. I knew. However I still didn’t get my answer and I am pretty sure it’s still a common thing going on in classrooms and schools today. I am grateful that as a visiting teacher, we are given a bit more freedom with what we can do during the day at school.

First things first, I know that kids can naturally get bored and seek out more engaging things. It happens all the time. Even if they don’t say it they might act out or refuse to do anything. Today I’d like to talk about this from an Indigo perspective.

In older generations of schooling, sure we may have gotten bored, however there may have been a higher tendency to reserve or stuff down feelings in fear of getting reprimanded or punished verbally or physically and usually the response to “do we really have to this Miss or Sir?” would be “yes it’s in the curriculum and you have to do it because you have to.” Naturally kids would say “Okay”, and continue with what they were doing.
Things were a bit different back then in terms of the school system, disciplining children and the ways that children were taught.

Reflecting upon these and comparing this with theย  more diverse needs of students and teachers these days responding to a simple, honest question of a young person in a classroom withindex “because you have to” simply isn’t going to cut it. Remember that Indigos can detect truth in the words, feelings and responses of those around them, themselves included. They are also quite intuitive so they’ll have an inborn sensitivity and greater level of extra-sensory perception. So what if they really are seeing in their futures that they won’t need to know what they’re being taught in school?

So if you think about a teacher who simply tells them “because they have to“, do you really think an Indigo Child is going to believe them? How about the Indigo can sense that he or she won’t be needing to recall any of this knowledge in their future? What if these children can sense in the teachers, that they too know that this knowledge is irrelevant or not important in the future? Where does that leave the teacher and the student?

Well for the Indigo who acts upon their feelings, then they’re not going to pay attention or they’re not going to be very interested in what’s going on. If there’s no relevance in their lives then perhaps they may even feel compelled to leave the learning environment, and in older kids, they may skip classes or school, play up in the classroom or tune into their own world.

It’s not to say that school education is insignificant to these children, moreso, they are seeking answers and we need to be prepared to answer them or to ask them more questions to guide them along their own inquiry of life. Perhaps as a teacher you could focus on what skills and values they are actually learning and link this into their everyday life experience. Integrate learning into contexts which are significant to them. Think carefully about what you say to them, because if you’re coming from a place that is uncertain, then how can they trust you and what you’ve got to offer?

Also keep in mind that learning new skills offers them the opportunity to open up and access neural pathways. Expanding their awareness and their skill sets rather than simply filling them with facts and figures. Explore different ways of teaching. There are many different styles to teach, not simply just chalk and talk, textbooks and reading, writing and arithmetic.

Another thing to remember is that discipline in some cases only reinforces a child’s behaviour, ironically, making them aware that they can get out of doing something by not doing it in the first place and thus being removed. It also has implications of coming from a fear based perspective (eg. do something this way or else this outcome will happen to you), so how about being a teacher by living and leading by example? If you want the children to be interested in what you’ve got to teach, make sure you’re interested in it too. Make sure you make it engaging and inclusive for everyone!

Be creative in your teaching and allow your students to be the same. Let them genuinely express themselves and their ideas and experiences of education. I understand the work of a teacher and the fact that they need to meet the standards of syllabus documents and such and I have much respect for the work that you do. It’s time to see Indigo Children and or ADHD children as a generation of emerging and developing cognition. Think outside the box and remember that just because you are a teacher, that doesn’t mean that you are no longer a student. The kids in your classroom are your teachers as you are theirs. Be the one who empowers them to seek answers and ask questions in their learning and be the one who encourages them to explore through connecting with them and what they hold in their hearts.

Sometimes school is unable to cater for some people whose interests are aligned elsewhere. That’s absolutely fine and just because school isn’t your thing, that doesn’t make you a failure of the system or a failure of life. I know many Indigos who felt alien in the school system and since leaving formal schooling they’ve excelled in their passions and are giving life all they’ve got. They’re the ones making a difference, showing the younger ones that when you find what your heart calls for you can achieve anything.

 

3 thoughts on “Indigo Children, Defiance and the Classroom: “Why do we have to do this at School?” “I’m Bored” “I’m Outta Here”

  1. Thanks for this great look at children in the school place. As I read it, I thought it has information for parents and other meaningful people in an Indigo’s life. Just because you are both looking out the same window, does not mean you are both seeing the same thing, the same way.

    • Hello Melissa, thank you for the lovely comment ๐Ÿ™‚
      We are looking at the development and advances of human consciousness, and ADHD as another form of cognition. It really is about whether one sees life from down in the valley or up above on the mountain. Both are equally as important yet we need to understand both for individuals’ sake ๐Ÿ™‚

      Thanks for sharing the love!

  2. Reblogged this on The Go Between: Psychics, Mediums and Integrity by Melissa Leath and commented:
    Diary Indigo written by Nathan has a wealth of information straight from the source of an experienced Indigo! This particular article is so important for teachers, as well as, parents and other role models of children today. If you are — or know — a teacher who is in the regular school system, this idea of defiance in the classroom can be seen in many different ways. It may not really be defiance, but a need to understand the reasoning behind an exercise or lesson. Please enjoy the article, and feel free to share with others…M/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s